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January 30, 2007

Feb. 12: Hawaiian scholar Noenoe Silva speaks on native resistance to colonialism

 
Ho’ohemokolonaio
Hawaiian scholar lectures on resistance to colonization and leads a workshop on revitalizing native languages
 
Noenoe Silva, author of Aloha Betrayed, a Political scientist Noenoe Silva
prizewinning book on Hawaiian resistance to
colonialism, will give a free public lecture at
7 p.m. on Monday, February 12 in  Room 110
of the Knight Law Center, 1515 Agate Street on the University of Oregon campus in Eugene.
 
The title of her speech is “Ho’ohemokolonaio:  Why Political Decolonization Is Not Enough for Kanaka Maoli in Hawai’i.” 
(Ho-ohemokolonaio = decolonization
 Kanaka Maoli = indigenous Hawaiian.) 
 
Earlier that day, she will lead a public workshop on the importance of native languages in cultural

studies programs. (Registration required – see below.)

Silva, a political scientist at the University of Hawaii, is this year’s Wayne Morse Center Distinguished Speaker. She is an indigenous Hawaiian born on Oahu. 
 
Her book, Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism, published by Duke University Press, won the Baldridge prize for best book in history by a resident of Hawaii for 2004.
 

She has also written on the role of hula, literature and representations of women in Native Hawaiian literature. 


MORE ABOUT THE LECTURE 
Ho’ohemokolonaio:  Why Political Decolonization Is Not Enough for Kanaka Maoli in Hawai’i
 
Silva will discuss political independence of the Hawaiian Islands and the thrust for recognition of indigenous Hawaiians analogous to federal recognition of Indian tribes on the U.S. mainland. 
 
She will argue that neither of these scenarios satisfies the needs of indigenous Hawaiians, Kanaka Maoli, for dignity, freedom and self-determination.
 
INFO: 541- 346-3700
 
MORE ABOUT THE WORKSHOP
Moving the Center: Putting Indigenous Language at the Center of Indigenous and Cultural Studies.
 
This workshop will appeal to students, faculty and community members interested in indigenous language revitalization, cultural and ethnic studies and indigenous rights.
 
Silva will describe the history of the Hawaiian language revitalization movement, why it was needed, and its current status and limitations. 
 
She will also discuss her current work of documenting the history of Hawaiian intellectuals in their own language, thereby “shifting the center” from a focus on translating indigenous languages to understanding and creating history and culture in the indigenous language itself. 
 
The workshop will be held at the Many Nations Longhouse, at 16th and Columbia on the UO campus.  It is free and includes lunch. Registration is required. Call (541) 346-3700 or email the  Morse Center


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