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February 15, 2008

WWII Internment of Japanese-Americans To Be Remembered at Oregon Law Feb. 23

The World War II-era internment and incarceration of thousands of persons of Japanese ancestry will be the subject of an address by Dr. Tetsudan Kashijma at the University of Oregon School of Law, February 23, as part of the Eugene Day of Remembrance 2008.  The talk will take place at 10 a.m. in Room 175, William W. Knight Law Center, 1515 Agate Street.  The event is free and open to the public.

During World War II, thousands of persons of Japanese ancestry in the United States, Canada, and various Latin American countries were dispossessed from their homes and interned or incarcerated without a charge, trial, or conviction.  Who were these people?  Why did this happen?  How did this happen?  What happened to these people?

Dr. Tetsuden Kashima will respond to these questions in a talk entitled, “WWII Internment and Incarceration: Japanese Ancestry Persons the United States, Canada, and Latin America.”  Dr. Kashima was born in Oakland, California, and was incarcerated at the Topaz WRA Center during World War II.  Dr. Kashima is a Professor in the Department of American Studies, and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Sociology, at the University of Washington.  Dr. Kashima’s publications include Judgment Without Trial: Japanese American Imprisonment During World War II.

The Eugene Day of Remembrance is sponsored in part by the University of Oregon School of Law, whose graduate Minoru Yasui was interned.  Mr. Yasui went on to challenge the legality of the internment, and to spend his life championing civil and human rights.  The School of Law hopes to establish an endowed faculty position in human rights in his name. 

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Oregon Law » Newsroom » WWII Internment of Japanese-Americans To Be Remembered at Oregon Law Feb. 23