Jump to Content
Apply Today


Newsroom

September 16, 2008

Mark Graber to deliver public address on ‘Polarization and the Courts’ September 23

The Wayne Morse Chair for Law and Politics Mark Graber will deliver a public address titled “Polarization and the Courts” at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 23, in Knight Law Center room 175.

In his address, Professor Graber will examine how polarization may have a surprisingly moderating influence on federal courts and how sharp partisan conflicts can actually set in motion forces that tend to moderate judicial outcomes. He cites divisive issues such as abortion to show that the Supreme Court reflects the center of American political thought while the political parties are more inclined to the extreme. Graber will discuss how sharp partisan conflict can lead to judicial moderation.

Professor Graber teaches law and government at the University of Maryland School of Law in Baltimore. While in residence at Oregon Law, Professor Graber teaches Judicial Review and Democracy, which explores the legal, philosophical, historical, and political issues raised by the judicial power to declare laws unconstitutional. He is a graduate of Columbia Law School and earned a doctorate in political science from Yale University.

Professor Graber is recognized as one of the leading scholars in the country on constitutional law and politics. He is the author of Rethinking Abortion (Princeton University Press) and Transforming Free Speech (University of California Press). His most recent book is Dred Scott and the Problem of Constitutional Evil (Cambridge University Press). He has published scores of articles on American constitutional development, civil liberties during war, the first amendment, and the intersection of political and legal questions.

This event is free and open to the public. For additional information, contact the Wayne Morse Center at 541-346-3700.

Bookmark and Share


Oregon Law » Newsroom » Mark Graber to deliver public address on ‘Polarization and the Courts’ September 23