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August 29, 2012

Oregon Law welcomes LL.M. class of 2012-2013

The University of Oregon School of Law is excited to usher in a group of 12 diverse students to the LL.M. in Environmental and Natural Resources Law class of 2013. The class includes students with a variety of professional and academic backgrounds hailing from more than eight countries, including China, Mexico, Chile, Cameroon, Columbia, Australia, Tanzania, and India. These students are part of a select group to study at the only leading U.S. research university to offer an LL.M. in Environmental and Natural Resources Law.

Learn more about Oregon Law's LL.M class of 2013:

Dan Zummo is a recent graduate from the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in California. He has spent the past two years travelling while taking law classes in several countries, including China and France. He is hoping to parlay this LL.M. into a position with a governmental agency or NGO that handles natural resources law.

Josh Cleaver is also a recent graduate from the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in California. His interest in environmental law emerged during an internship with the Sierra Club and the Pala Band of Mission Indians. He is particularly focused on water rights and environmentally-conscious land use planning.

Elina Alinezhan is returning this fall from Iran after a semester-long break from studies.

Lance Quaranto graduated from Whittier Law School in Costa Mesa, California in fall of 2011. He plans to enter the public sector and has interned with a local planning department. He hopes to merge his passion for railroads with his environmental law experience to expand the use of rail for transit purposes.

Shaoyuan Wu is a Ph.D. candidate in marine resources at Ocean University of China in Shandong. After receiving his LL.M., he plans to take China’s National Judicial Exam for bar admission, seek a position as a university professor or civil servant, and start an NGO focusing on environmental protection. Wu is the first non-lawyer in this school's LL.M. program.

Ximena Ramos is a law school graduate from Mexico. For the past last two years she has worked at a human rights litigation organization. Ramos has a special interest in the connection between human rights and the environment, especially in regard to food sovereignty and the consultation of indigenous and urban communities. In her spare time she enjoys travelling and attending concerts.

Juan Prieto left his position as Regional Minister Secretary for the Environment for one Chile's 15 regions to join Oregon Law's LL.M. program. Prieto is currently in the process of drafting a decontamination plan for part of the region in order to address air pollution. He is joining the school's LL.M. program to expand his knowledge of environmental law in other countries to improve Chilean policies.

Ekontang Makia is a lawyer in Cameroon. In the past he obtained a Master’s degree and an LL.B. law degree while doing research on the effects of the Chad-Cameroon pipeline project. He is currently working with the faculty of Peace and Development Studies at the Protestant University of Central Africa. He is also a consultant for the School for International Training in Yaoundé.

Carlos Lozano Acosta is a Colombian environmental lawyer and researcher, with a special focus in environmental damage reparations. He has worked for international organizations such as the German Agency of International Cooperation and the International Center for Transitional Justice, and has advised the Colombian Ministry of Environment on hazardous waste. He is currently an Associated Researcher at the Institute of Genetics of the National University of Colombia.

Noni Austin is an environment and planning lawyer in Sidney, Australia. She handles the environmental assessment process for major development projects, environmental incidents and native title law. Prior to practicing as a lawyer, she worked as an associate to a judge in the Land and Environment Court of New South Wales. Austin has a particular interest in environmental conservation and hopes to one day work at an NGO.

Maneka Kaur, who originally hails from the mountainous Jammu and Kashmir region of India, graduated from law school in Delhi this year. Environmental law became “a calling” for her when she studied cases about the chemical disaster in Bhopal and other conservation and pollution incidents. In her private time Kaur is an avid sketch artist.

Elifuraha Laltaika is a Lecturer of Law in Tumaini University Makumira in Tanzania and an Advocate of the High Court. He grew up among cattle herders in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, a UNESCO World Heritage site. He provides volunteer legal aid to hunter- gatherers there and their NGOs. He is passionate about human rights and environmental conservation, and has worked with the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility, the United Nations REDD Program, the Convention on Biological Diversity, and the UN’s Framework Convention on Climate Change.

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