CRES Concurrent Degrees

The skills and understandings developed in the study of conflict and its resolution offer added value when paired with other professional pursuits. Those working in the fields of business, international studies, political science, environmental studies, psychology, sociology, public administration, or nonprofit management, for example, can significantly add to their qualifications in these fields by developing expertise in the management of conflict.

Conflict and Dispute Resolution students have the option to pursue concurrent degrees: a JD and Master’s (in four years) or two Master’s degrees (in three years). Likewise, students from other disciplines can add to their credentials and skills by pursuing a concurrent Conflict and Dispute Resolution Master’s degree.

To become a concurrent degree student, you must apply to and be accepted into both programs. You may apply to both programs simultaneously and, upon being accepted into both, decide with which program to begin. Or you may apply to one program and, if accepted, apply to the second program during your first year in the first program.

Arrangements for satisfying the requirements of both graduate degrees (electives, internships, final projects) are agreed upon between departments. Within the Conflict and Dispute Resolution Master’s Program (CRES), adjustments may be made in the required number of elective or final project requirements. If you are interested in pursuing concurrent degrees, speak with our Managing Director about the concurrent degree process.  

Students have paired Conflict Resolution Master's degrees with disciplines including Law, International Studies, Environmental Studies, Community and Regional Planning, Public Administration, Nonprofit Management, Business Administration, and others.


Generally, to concurrently pursue a JD and Conflict Resolution Master’s degree, you will do one of the following:

  • begin with a year in the Master’s program followed by three years of Law during which you will complete the remaining Master’s requirements (internship and final project), or
  • begin with one year of Law, devote the second year exclusively to the Master’s program, and then return to Law for the third and fourth years during which you will complete the remaining Master’s requirements, or
  • begin with two years of Law, devote the third year exclusively to the Master’s program, and then return to Law for the fourth years during which you will complete the remaining Master’s requirements.