Native Environmental Sovereignty Project

Fellows with the Native Environmental Sovereignty Project explore the intersection of tribal sovereignty with the protection of tribal natural resources.

Current Project

Tribal Tools & Legal Levers for Halting Fossil Fuel Transport & Exports Through the Pacific Northwest

The Native Environmental Sovereignty Project under the guidance of Professor Mary Wood published "Tribal Tools and Legal Levers for Halting Fossil Fuel Transport & Exports Through the Pacific Northwest" in the American Indian Law Journal. This article highlights strategic legal avenues available to tribes in both on- and off-reservation contexts.

Tribal Guide to the Legal Landscapes of Fossil Fuel Infrastructure Projects

Faculty

NESP Fellows

Ana Colwell- 2L- Bowerman Fellow

Ana was born in Korea, and as the child of missionary/English teachers, grew up in Japan, Chile, Mexico, and Peru. After earning her undergrad degree in Arizona, she chose the University of Oregon School of Law because if its environmental law program. She cultivated her passion for environmental and Indigenous law by reconnecting with her own Native American roots through her paternal family who are of the Osage Nation. Ana hopes to stay in Oregon after school to continue to explore the beauty of the state and wants to use her future law career to advocate on behalf of indigenous Tribes of the Northwest.

Ellen Ipsen- 2L- Bowerman Fellow

Ellen was born and raised in Missoula, Montana, where she cultivated a passion for wild places and protecting indigenous rights.  Prior to law school, Ellen received her B.A. in History and Economics at the University of Montana and she has worked with several advocacy organizations on environmental, land, and student rights.  After law school, she hopes to continue fighting for human rights and open space protection.

Haley Hampstead- 2L- Bowerman Fellow 

Haley grew up in the Denver-Metro area and earned her BS in Geospatial Science from Metropolitan State University of Denver. During her undergrad, she developed a keen interest in American Indian resource issues, particularly those related to water rights. This fascination became her passion and eventually led Haley to the University of Oregon School of Law where she hopes to explore the intersection of Indian and Water law further. 

Anne Wolke- 2L- Bowerman Fellow 

Anne is originally from Eastern Oregon and enjoys exploring diverse ecosystems throughout the Pacific Northwest. Anne received a B.S. in Sociology and Anthropology from Southern Oregon University. Her research interests include settler colonialism and Indigenous survivance, the archaeology of the Pacific Northwest, cultural rights, water law and policy, and environmental human rights. 

Summary Sheet

Archive of the events and scholarship of the NESP.

Resources