ADR: Academics

The primary focus of those working with the ADR Center is education.  In 2016, the ADR Center received the Ninth Circuit ADR Education Award for excellence in ADR pedagogy.  Additionally, four of our ADR faculty have received the law school's Orlando J. Hollis teaching award and two have received the University of Oregon's Ersted Award for distinguished teaching.

The ADR Center supports courses and clinics in the law school, in the Conflict & Dispute Resolution Master's Degree (CRES) program, in the LLM program, and in the Undergraduate Legal Studies program.  We offer a concentration for J.D. students in ADR.  We deliver and co-sponsor periodic trainings for students, UO staff, and community members.


What ADR-related classes can law students take?

 

The law school offers a full slate of ADR courses, including Negotiation; Mediation; Arbitration; ADR Strategies for Litigation; ADR Survey; Law of Settlement; Federal Judicial Settlements; Interviewing and Counseling; and Race, Gender, Bias, and Law.  All of these courses (except Race, Gender, Bias, and Law) qualify as skills courses and as experiential courses.  (Race, Gender, Bias, and Law can count as a writing course, however.)  Check with your professor if you would like more information about skills or experiential learning.

To view the University of Oregon Course Catalog, click here.  Law students may also cross-register for many graduate classes in the CRES Program (course information here).  Students who want to concentrate in ADR or build an interdisciplinary course of study should consider our Dispute Resolution Concentration and concurrent degree programs


What ADR clinics and field placements are available?

 

  • Small Claims Mediation Clinic.  After completing a 32-hour basic mediation training, students spend one morning each week in a local small claims court, helping disputants search for non-litigation solutions to their problems.
  • Nonprofit Clinic.  The clinic is a joint venture with the UO’s Department of Planning, Public Policy & Management and the Master’s Degree Program in Conflict and Dispute Resolution, where students learn about nonprofit work with the assistance of experienced practitioners in the field, and through hands-on experience working with non-profit clients. Through the program, students will learn how to negotiate the legal landscape of nonprofit organizations, which will allow them to help these facilitators of community improvement in the most constructive way.
  • Public Policy Facilitation Training and Externship.   This intensive training, offered through a partnership with the National Policy Consensus Center, provides an introduction to the use of collaborative governance approaches for addressing complex public policy issues. Emphasis is placed on how to apply the five stages of the collaborative process to resolve issues, including the skills needed to structure meetings, facilitate groups and reach decisions using consensus. Interested participants are then placed on internship or externship projects throughout Oregon.
  • Other Externships.  The law school keeps a list of pre-approved externships and also makes it possible for students to propose new externships, information here.  Many of these opportunities relate to ADR practice in dispute resolution or transactional contexts. 

What extracurricular academic opportunities exist?

 

  • NPCC Training. This intensive training, offered through a partnership with the National Policy Consensus Center, provides an introduction to the use of collaborative governance approaches for addressing complex public policy issues. Emphasis is placed on how to apply the five stages of the collaborative process to resolve issues -- including the skills needed to structure meetings, facilitate groups and reach decisions using consensus. Interested participants are then placed on internship or externship projects throughout Oregon.
  • UO Trainings.  Our faculty occasionally offer trainings on dispute resolution and related subjects.  Check the UO Professional Development website or follow our Twitter feed for information. 
  • Law School Events and Workshops.  Throughout the year, ADR faculty and interested students may sponsor events and workshops (either separate from or part of the Big Question programming) that focus on skill development, networking, or conflict theory.  Announcements for these events will come through the ADR twitter feed and/or the law school listservs.

Research, Writing, and Independent Study

 

Students who are interested in further ADR-related research should talk to an ADR faculty member about opportunities to work on the faculty member's current research or to develop the student's own research plan.  Former students have, for example, worked with ADR faculty on research involving restorative justice; negotiation pedagogy in international contexts; and conflict resolution in schools.  Additionally, J.D. students who want to complete their writing requirement on an ADR-related topic are welcome to approach an ADR faculty member for supervision.  In appropriate cases, the faculty member may sponsor an independent study for the student.  Finally, the ADR Center regularly sends out information on ADR student writing competitions.  For more information, please contact our Program Manager, Aileen Carlos.